Key stage 2 results for 2016 published

05/07/2016

National Key Stage 2 test (SATs) results have been published today for the new primary school testing system in maths and English. Parents will receive their child’s results before the end of the summer term.

This year’s results are the first to be released following the introduction of a new curriculum in 2014. Today’s national results are not directly comparable to test results from previous years which were under a different system of assessment.

Results are no longer reported as levels, and each pupil will now receive their test results as score between 120 and 80 – with 100 being the expected standard.

Today’s results show:

  • 53% of pupils met the new expected standard (100) in reading, writing and mathematics
  • 66% of pupils met the new expected standard (100) in reading
  • 70% of pupils met the new expected standard (100) in mathematics
  • 72% of pupils met the new expected standard (100) in grammar, punctuation and spelling
  • 74% of pupils met the new expected standard (100) in writing

This year the “average” pupil is performing above the expected standard:

  • the average scaled score in reading is 103
  • the average scaled score in mathematics is 103
  • the average scaled score in grammar, punctuation and spelling is 104

Today’s results form one part of how primary school performance is measured - later in the year results for pupil progress will be published.

Emma Knights, Chief Executive of the National Governors’ Association, said: “Today’s results are the first to reflect the Government’s new primary curriculum and governing boards should know that they cannot compare them with results from previous years. It’s important for governing boards to take the time to make sense of this data and consider the national picture. Unfortunately it will be December before the full information is available. As many as 47% of parents will be told that their 10 or 11 year-old has not met the expected standards in at least one of reading, writing and maths and this may well be disappointing both for parents and their children; communication with parents will therefore be a priority. We would urge the Government to consider whether a system where almost half of children leave primary school failing to reach the expected standard is a helpful one.”

More information:

Department for Education Press release: New primary school tests show schools rising to the challenge

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